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SEVENTY-SIX YEAR REMIX

It's easy to understand why Ansel Adams took one of his iconic images from this very place in 1942. Seventy-six Years have since past (2018). Trees have grown, the Snake River has even changed its flow pattern, but the beauty of this mystical place will be embedded for eternity.

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GRAND REVELATION

The morning began eclipsed in cloud cover. Methodically the Tetons reveal themselves, boasting their dominance, and marveling at their own beauty as they reflect in the Snake River below.

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GUARDIAN OF THE GARDEN

The majestic Tetons offer a natural layer of protection as they overwatch one of the most important bodies of water in the Pacific Northwest, the Snake River, which provides sustenance from the Continental Divide to the Columbia River.

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JACKSON LAKE LIGHTS

At an elevation of 6,772 feet above sea level, Jackson Lake is one of the largest high altitude lakes in the United States. It's positioned at the western edge of Grand Teton National Park, which set the stage for a spectacular Winter Solstice light show.

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STRUGGLE FOR DOMINANCE

Teewinot Mountain momentarily dominates the horizon as Grand Teton desperately battles the relentless low lying clouds infused with a unique last light, insinuating a millennial long rivalry over elevational superiority.

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30 YEAR ICON

In 1910 Thomas Alma settled into Mormon Row after strategically positioning his plot just south of his brother John. It took nearly 30 years for Thomas to complete his iconic barn. In the mid-1900s, Mormon Row was acquired to expand Grand Teton National Park and in 1997 Thomas’ barn was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

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SAVOR THE MOMENT

A bull moose grazing in Grand Teton National Park momentarily pauses as the last light of early winter cascades off of his back and reflecting a warm glow as the sun briefly impacts his skinless paddles.

Moose are the largest member of the deer family and commonly called as such in North America which is derived from the word moosh “stripper and eater of bark". The species specific to Wyoming are typically the smallest where large bulls like this one can weigh in at 800 pounds. I can personally vouch that this animal looked much bigger in person as I was a mere 75 feet away when I captured this image!

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AMERICAN NOMAD

A North American Bison intermittent pauses from grazing to flaunt his winter coat as the morning sun cascades across his back. Time is of the essence as he instinctively understands the need to pack on additional weight for the upcoming winter season.

Bison once roamed North America in vast herds reaching as far as New York and North Carolina. In the late 18th century commercial hunting turned a population in excess of 60 million, to a scant 541 animals by 1889. Thanks to mid-twentieth century efforts, the species has rebounded to approximately 30,000 (2017). In 2016, the American bison became the national mammal of the United States.